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Hydrogen

Using Hydrogen as fuel – FAQ’s. 

There are many times when there is wind/solar/hydro electrical power being generated, but there is no demand. As a result, it it simply shut down until required again. 

Of course, it is best to use this power. In our case, when there is surplus renewable energy, we store it as hydrogen. To facilitate this, we use hydrogen energy storage technologies.

This hydrogen can then be used for cooking, heating, cooling, electrical power generation, as a fuel for transport, for chemical process, etc.

Yes – and the process has over 150 years.

When hydrogen is produced using renewable energy and electrolysis process, then it is produced in an environmental manner.

For instance, if you take the power generated from a wind turbine to supply an electrolyzer with this green power, then you will be producing green hydrogen.

Yes, hydrogen gas is now being used aggressively as a fuel for passenger vehicles and other transport systems.

It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors and combined with battery constitutes a hybrid fuel cell battery electric vehicle. It can also be burned in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs) such as the one used in our vehicles.

Hydrogen is seen as a green or pure fuel because H2 is an environmentally friendly fuel with no associated CO2 emission. It can also be produced without any emissions.

As such hydrogen has the potential to dramatically reduce our dependence on imported oil as well as reduce the dangers associated with emissions.

Hydrogen, in gaseous form, is widely stored in Hydrogen high-pressure storage cylinders, tubes or tube trailers.

In liquid form, hydrogen is mainly stored at the consumer site in cryogenic liquid tank or cylinders. These liquid hydrogen tanks are highly insulated and specifically designed to reduce evaporation of the Hydrogen gas.

Liquid hydrogen is dangerous and therefore only trained individuals must handle it with care.

The hydrogen concentration in air detection unit is highly advisable.

As a rule of thumb, any hydrogen system (H2 compressor, hydrogen generator, H2 steam reformation system, etc.) should be located in a highly ventilated area.

It is also best practice to use a hydrogen monitoring system which will monitor the hydrogen in air concentration and if the set up threshold is reached, then the system is shut down and hydrogen vented in the air to make it inert.

To dispose of hydrogen gas from a pressurised hydrogen vessel, one should vent the hydrogen slowly to a well-ventilated outdoor location remote from personal work areas and building air intakes. Usually, a hydrogen pipe is used to do this.

As for liquid Hydrogen, first, allow the H2 to evaporate. Liquid Hydrogen boils quickly, so there should not be an issue to get it to transform to its gaseous form.

Yes, it is safe as long as you know what you are doing.

Hydrogen is like any flammable fuel such as natural gas and petrol – it requires care and safe handling. Many scientists agree that the properties of hydrogen make it safer than other conventional fuels in many cases.

The two main methods for transporting hydrogen are in compressed tankers and in gas pipelines. However there are new techniques such as in liquid form in Ammonia.

Yes – Hydrogen can be used in a petrol car.

Modification of your fuel supply system in the car is required. Then your vehicle will run on two fuels, petrol, and hydrogen. Between three to four litres of water is needed to produce the equivalent of 1 litre of petrol.

This is not advisable. You will need to get a company with expertise in hydrogen installations so that you reduce your installation risk.

Do not forget, you are dealing with flammable gas, and if you do not know how to handle this gas, then it is preferable that you allow experts in this field to support you in your project.

Yes. You just need to find someone who wants to buy it such as a hydrogen bus, fuel cell manufacturer or users and others.

Yes. Like any other system, you need to do some maintenance work on a hydrogen system. We provide all our systems with standard maintenance contracts.

This all depends on size and site specifics. Please contact us to discuss your requirements. 

Renewable Energy

Using Solar & Wind Turbines as fuel – FAQ’s. 

  • 6kW: £27k – £30k
  • 10kW: £45k – £55k
  • 50kW: £140k – £170k
  • 1MW: £1,000k

Please note that each project has its own ground works, shipment costs and sometimes feasibility study requirements.

 This will depend on size of wind turbine and the location. The below provides an example for a 6kW wind turbine.

Size / Wind speed

5m/s

6m/s

7m/s

8/ms

6kW

11,000kWh

16,000kWh

21,000kWh

25,000kWh

This depends on the size of your wind turbine and site. For instance a 6kW wind turbine on a good site has the potential to earn up to £7,000 a year. A 10kW, has the potential to earn up to £12,000 and 50kW turbine up to £50,000 per year.

This all depends on the size and number of wind turbines you want to install. For example, for a small wind turbine of 6kW, it is recommended to allow 150 metres distance from anything (such as a house or shed).

Income Tax: If you are a company, revenue generated from the Feed In Tariff will be subject to taxation. If your installation is on a domestic dwelling then the Feed In Tariff will be tax free. 

Electricity/Utilities: You are required to register your installation with a utility company to claim your Feed In Tariff. This is a process that we can help you with.

Planning Permission: You would need to obtain your planning permission services from your local Council / Authority. We can support you through this process.

 

Maintenance: Turbines will typically require basic annual maintenance. We support with this.

Warranty: Each turbine manufacturer has its own warranty period ranging from 2 – 10 years.

Lifespan: The lifetime of a wind turbine usually varies between manufacturers but a typical design life is between 15 – 20 years.

  • 6kW: £27k – £30k
  • 10kW: £45k – £55k
  • 50kW: £140k – £170k
  • 1MW: £1,000k

Please note that each project has its own ground works, shipment costs and sometimes feasibility study requirements.

 This will depend on size of wind turbine and the location. The below provides an example for a 6kW wind turbine.

Size / Wind speed

5m/s

6m/s

7m/s

8/ms

6kW

11,000kWh

16,000kWh

21,000kWh

25,000kWh

This depends on the size of your wind turbine and site. For instance a 6kW wind turbine on a good site has the potential to earn up to £7,000 a year. A 10kW, has the potential to earn up to £12,000 and 50kW turbine up to £50,000 per year.

This all depends on the size and number of wind turbines you want to install. For example, for a small wind turbine of 6kW, it is recommended to allow 150 metres distance from anything (such as a house or shed).

Income Tax: If you are a company, revenue generated from the Feed In Tariff will be subject to taxation. If your installation is on a domestic dwelling then the Feed In Tariff will be tax free. 

Electricity/Utilities: You are required to register your installation with a utility company to claim your Feed In Tariff. This is a process that we can help you with.

Planning Permission: You would need to obtain your planning permission services from your local Council / Authority. We can support you through this process.

 

Maintenance: Turbines will typically require basic annual maintenance. We support with this.

Warranty: Each turbine manufacturer has its own warranty period ranging from 2 – 10 years.

Lifespan: The lifetime of a wind turbine usually varies between manufacturers but a typical design life is between 15 – 20 years.

Nitrogen

Using Nitrogen as fuel – FAQ’s. 

There are many times when there is wind/solar/hydro electrical power being generated, but there is no demand. As a result, it it simply shut down until required again. 

Of course, it is best to use this power. In our case, when there is surplus renewable energy, we store it as hydrogen. To facilitate this, we use hydrogen energy storage technologies.

This hydrogen can then be used for cooking, heating, cooling, electrical power generation, as a fuel for transport, for chemical process, etc.

Yes – and the process has over 150 years.

When hydrogen is produced using renewable energy and electrolysis process, then it is produced in an environmental manner.

For instance, if you take the power generated from a wind turbine to supply an electrolyzer with this green power, then you will be producing green hydrogen.

Yes, hydrogen gas is now being used aggressively as a fuel for passenger vehicles and other transport systems.

It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors and combined with battery constitutes a hybrid fuel cell battery electric vehicle. It can also be burned in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs) such as the one used in our vehicles.

Hydrogen is seen as a green or pure fuel because H2 is an environmentally friendly fuel with no associated CO2 emission. It can also be produced without any emissions.

As such hydrogen has the potential to dramatically reduce our dependence on imported oil as well as reduce the dangers associated with emissions.

Hydrogen, in gaseous form, is widely stored in Hydrogen high-pressure storage cylinders, tubes or tube trailers.

In liquid form, hydrogen is mainly stored at the consumer site in cryogenic liquid tank or cylinders. These liquid hydrogen tanks are highly insulated and specifically designed to reduce evaporation of the Hydrogen gas.

Liquid hydrogen is dangerous and therefore only trained individuals must handle it with care.

The hydrogen concentration in air detection unit is highly advisable.

As a rule of thumb, any hydrogen system (H2 compressor, hydrogen generator, H2 steam reformation system, etc.) should be located in a highly ventilated area.

It is also best practice to use a hydrogen monitoring system which will monitor the hydrogen in air concentration and if the set up threshold is reached, then the system is shut down and hydrogen vented in the air to make it inert.

To dispose of hydrogen gas from a pressurised hydrogen vessel, one should vent the hydrogen slowly to a well-ventilated outdoor location remote from personal work areas and building air intakes. Usually, a hydrogen pipe is used to do this.

As for liquid Hydrogen, first, allow the H2 to evaporate. Liquid Hydrogen boils quickly, so there should not be an issue to get it to transform to its gaseous form.

Hydrogen, in gaseous form, is widely stored in Hydrogen high-pressure storage cylinders, tubes or tube trailers.

In liquid form, hydrogen is mainly stored at the consumer site in cryogenic liquid tank or cylinders. These liquid hydrogen tanks are highly insulated and specifically designed to reduce evaporation of the Hydrogen gas.

Liquid hydrogen is dangerous and therefore only trained individuals must handle it with care.

The hydrogen concentration in air detection unit is highly advisable.

As a rule of thumb, any hydrogen system (H2 compressor, hydrogen generator, H2 steam reformation system, etc.) should be located in a highly ventilated area.

It is also best practice to use a hydrogen monitoring system which will monitor the hydrogen in air concentration and if the set up threshold is reached, then the system is shut down and hydrogen vented in the air to make it inert.

To dispose of hydrogen gas from a pressurised hydrogen vessel, one should vent the hydrogen slowly to a well-ventilated outdoor location remote from personal work areas and building air intakes. Usually, a hydrogen pipe is used to do this.

As for liquid Hydrogen, first, allow the H2 to evaporate. Liquid Hydrogen boils quickly, so there should not be an issue to get it to transform to its gaseous form.

Oxygen

Using Oxygen as fuel – FAQ’s. 

  • 6kW: £27k – £30k
  • 10kW: £45k – £55k
  • 50kW: £140k – £170k
  • 1MW: £1,000k

Please note that each project has its own ground works, shipment costs and sometimes feasibility study requirements.

 This will depend on size of wind turbine and the location. The below provides an example for a 6kW wind turbine.

Size / Wind speed

5m/s

6m/s

7m/s

8/ms

6kW

11,000kWh

16,000kWh

21,000kWh

25,000kWh

This depends on the size of your wind turbine and site. For instance a 6kW wind turbine on a good site has the potential to earn up to £7,000 a year. A 10kW, has the potential to earn up to £12,000 and 50kW turbine up to £50,000 per year.

This all depends on the size and number of wind turbines you want to install. For example, for a small wind turbine of 6kW, it is recommended to allow 150 metres distance from anything (such as a house or shed).

Income Tax: If you are a company, revenue generated from the Feed In Tariff will be subject to taxation. If your installation is on a domestic dwelling then the Feed In Tariff will be tax free. 

Electricity/Utilities: You are required to register your installation with a utility company to claim your Feed In Tariff. This is a process that we can help you with.

Planning Permission: You would need to obtain your planning permission services from your local Council / Authority. We can support you through this process.